Tag: Nintendo DS

Lost in Blue – Second Opinion

I strongly suspect that the gameplay of Lost in Blue, which has a lot of hidden depth and open-ended options, can be radically different depending on how a player approaches the game. I can't say for sure that Brad and other critics that made similar complaints would feel any differently had they shared an experience closer to mine.

Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time – Review

Well, the DS does it again. Upon first glance, I doubted that this handheld would be home to much more than a bunch of gimmick-specific titles that took advantage of the various hardware features. I've been proven wrong, and I eat this crow gladly. The fact is, solid game after solid game keeps getting released, and although very few of them really exploit the unique nature of the DS, there's no denying that they are worthwhile efforts. Case in point—Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time.

Lost in Blue – Review

I loved it. I hated it. I still can't make up my mind. Lost in Blue is a rare game: one that has brilliant vision and dismal design choices in perfectly equal amounts. Its good and evil halves are so finely balanced, in fact, that I can't decide whether I should celebrate or revile it.

Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Review

When I first saw pictures of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney making the rounds as an example of "OMG, look at this freakish Japanese weirdness", I was captivated and depressed at the same time. Captivated because the thought of taking on the role of a defense lawyer in a videogame struck me as extremely interesting and unique. Depressed, because I thought Hell would freeze over before this game would ever be released in North America.

Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow – Review

The latest entry, Dawn of Sorrow, comes courtesy of the Nintendo DS. For those not familiar with the games (what, all four of you?) the action consists of taking the current main character, Soma Cruz, and exploring a large, intricate castle. Along the way, Soma collects various weapons and items, steadily gaining in strength and ability. Presented in glorious 2D, its colorful and attractive graphics are a good match for the handheld.

Trauma Center: Under the Knife – Review

With the unconventional design of the DS, Nintendo suggested that developers would step in and use its technological opportunities to create innovative games and new play experiences. Up to this point, I would say that this prophecy has gone largely unfulfilled. There have been some neat games to be sure, but in my opinion, very few of them have really capitalized on the things that separate the DS from the competition until Trauma Center: Under the Knife came along.