Tag: Call of Duty

Of Microsoft, gamers, pots, kettles and Call of Duty: Black Ops

Call of Duty: Black Ops Screenshot

When Xbox Live's director of policy and enforcement, Stephen Toulouse, stridently vowed to ban any Call of Duty: Black Ops player who sports a swastika emblem online, I can't say I felt any particular way about it. As an fence sitter on the subject of censorship, I much prefer to let others do the hard work of untangling that Gordian Knot.

Call of Duty: Black Ops Review

Mcnamara? Really? You Couldn't Throw Eisenhower or Truman in There?

Call of Duty: Black Ops Screenshot

HIGH: JFK spouting off one-liners while blasting zombies in the face.

LOW: The complete and total incompetence of my squadmates.

WTF: Why does the guy I'm torturing suddenly turn around and help me when the bad guys show up?

Around the Blogosphere: Game Bloggers Offer Comments on Modern Warfare 2’s “No Russian”

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Screenshot

I've already posted my take on Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2's now-(in)famous "No Russian" chapter. I was not content to simply post my own thoughts on the matter, however. Given the uproar and truly interesting commentary that has sprung up around the game sequence, I wanted to survey a few of my fellow bloggers regarding their own opinions and experiences. I received a handful of responses to my request for commentary: Some authors had played the sequence in question, some had not. Some felt quite strongly in the positive, others in the negative. Some responses were longer pieces, others were short remarks or pointed me towards an existing blog post.

That Bay State of Mind: Modern Warfare 2’s boom-filled campaign

That Bay State of Mind: Modern Warfare 2's boom-filled campaign

As first-person shooter campaigns go, it's definitely in the 95th percentile of enjoyable shooting galleries. But it's also a campaign that worries me. While playing through the brief solo mode (roughly five hours), I couldn't help but be reminded of the stereotypical Bay film: Things blow up, uber-macho soldiers shout, the player performs wild stunts (like jumping into a helicopter for the umpteenth time), and loud orchestral music plays. It doesn't seem to matter that the plot is poorly paced, makes very little sense, and no characters are developed. If I'm a typical M-rated gamer, all I'm supposed to care about is that I shot people and stuff blew up real purty.

Now about that terror attack level everyone’s talking about: A conversation with Danny Ledonne

Now about that terror attack level everyone's talking about: A conversation with 'Super Columbine Massacre RPG!’ creator Danny Ledonne"

In my review of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, I disagree with my peers that the game is not a compelling example for games as art, rather it's perfect for a sports argument. Take 36-year-old David Dague of Chicago. When interviewed by The Associated Press, he said the game's launch is like the start of football season for a sports fan, and the comparison couldn't be more fitting. But there's another, more obvious landmark the game reaches in the form of its controversial level, "No Russian."

Waiting for the backlash

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Screenshot

The Brainy Gamer blog featured a terrific post today directed at Infinity Ward's questionable "FAGS" advertising campaign, in which Phillies pitcher Cole Hamels decries grenade spam.  It's covert advertising for Modern Warfare 2, of course, although the acronym with which said message is provided is obviously the source of the most worry.

Modern Warfare 2 controversy, Demon’s Souls Halloween goodness and Half-Minute Hero

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Screenshot

So the word is basically out, and the level that has been causing all the commotion has been revealed to be used as a scene-setting device—basically establishing some context for the player's actions in the rest of the game. That was pretty much what I expected, but… it was also relayed that wherever this scene appears in the final retail version, it will be preceded by a warning about "graphic content" and the option to simply skip it and jump right into the part where the player goes back to being a "good guy".