Author: Thom Moyles

Beyond Good & Evil – Second Opinion

I'd love to agree with Gene. I'd love to because Beyond Good & Evil has aspects that give it the potential to be a really special videogame. Aspects like characters that have character (rather than some outlined archetype straight from the marketing department), a plotline that could have a lot to say about the ambiguity of moral choices, consistently stunning art direction and a refreshingly simple control scheme.

Champions of Norrath – Review

Usually we identify good videogames by the time that we spend with them. After all, if we spend loads of time playing a game, then it follows that the game is quality, right? Right? I'm not so sure. Even if a game compels us to play it, that doesn't necessarily means that the game is compelling. Spending hours reading Harlequin romances or watching old Transformers episodes is hardly an indication that the media involved is noteworthy. The human mind is easily entrapped.

Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu – Review

It used to be that "beat-'em-ups" were one of the major staples of videogames. I know that I sure played a ton of Final Fight, Golden Axe, Double Dragon and countless other games that were all variations on the theme of "keeping moving right while smashing the absolute crap out of anything that moves." As the medium has progressed, the beat-'em-up has become relegated to the back burner. There have been moments of brilliance, such as the Dynasty Warriors series, but increasingly the beat-'em-up is only the mechanical underpinning for games designed purely to cash in on an existing license.

Castlevania: Lament of Innocence – Second Opinion

It's been years and most of an entire console generation since one of the great franchises in videogame history has seen the light of day on a major console. The Castlevania franchise's undead second life on the Game Boy Advance was successful enough that it is surprising to see Konami try to leave the comfortable crypt of handheld gaming. Since the Nintendo 64 titles were reduced to critical dust, it makes sense that the new entry in the series, Castlevania: Lament of Innocence, is a tentative toe-dip into the potentially deadly running waters of 3D.

True Crime: Streets of LA – Review

Being one of the larger cities in the world, it's natural for LA to have a fair amount of crime; and being the media capital of the US (if not the world) means that said crime is usually treated as a spectacle (O.J. and Michael Jackson being two of the latest, greatest examples). Combine the amount of crime, the media-centric lifestyle, and a natural population of drivers who aren't the sharpest knives in the drawer and you've got a natural equation that equals the latest "action crime" videogame epic.

Freaky Flyers – Review

From the beginning, gamers have longed to kart race. Well, maybe that's not entirely true, but the racing genre, and especially "kart racers" have made up a consistent chunk of gaming libraries since Atari (the original one, not the new, fakey one) burst onto the scene. A kart racer is probably best described as a racing game that's less concerned with simulation as it is with allowing colorful, easily identifiable characters to joust with each other while whipping in circles around fantastical landscapes.