Author: Scott Jones

Ninja Gaiden Review

Ninja Gaiden Screenshot

Of all the hideous monsters and hellspawn that haunt Tecmo's third-person action game Ninja Gaiden—mace-weilding zombies, giant fire-breathing worms, faceless samurai—nothing frightened me more than demon hunter Rachel's ridiculously oversized breasts. No kidding. When I first encountered them—they're seriously the size of small Third World countries—I let out a ninja-like cry—something like "Aiieeeee!"—then braced myself (left trigger! left trigger!) for their attack.

Manhunt – Review

I have "fragged" millions, perhaps even billions of creatures, but never once did I ever suffocate anyone with a plastic bag. Not once did I castrate anyone with a sickle, or jab a glass shard multiple times into someone's face, or knock a man's head clean off with an aluminum baseball bat.

Freedom Fighters – Second Opinion

Brad's right—Freedom Fighters' juvenile take on world politics is indeed a missed opportunity, particularly during these volatile times. It could have been the videogame equivalent of Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket or Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front. Instead, the game is content being as politically shallow as Stripes.

Alter Echo – Second Opinion

After I managed to complete the final "rhythm" puzzle in Alter Echo (which requires near super-human hand-eye coordination to pull off), I found myself sitting in front of my TV, PlayStation 2 controller dangling from hand, craving more.

Roadkill – Review

It is with a heavy heart and more than a little reluctance that I publicly admit that, yes, I actually liked RoadKill. I enjoyed the game far more than I thought I would; enjoyed it far more than I probably should have.

Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow – Review

Games can usually be broken down into two distinct categories: experiences and diversions. Experiences tend to be ambitious games, large in scope and innovative in design. They can surprise me, knock me off balance, make me think and wonder and use my imagination.