Author: Daniel Weissenberger

Scooby-Doo: Night of 100 Frights – Review

Nostalgia can be a dangerous thing. It has the power to cripple the critical mind, bathing it in the rainbow-colored reminiscences of a bygone era. Who hasn't remembered a certain movie from their childhood with a fondness that far outweighs the film's actual merit? For me, that movie was Krull, the tale of a brave fantasy warrior battling laser-shooting cyborg slugmen with a giant throwing star called "The Glaive." It's not a very good movie. It's taken me years of introspection and therapy, though, to even be able to admit that.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Chaos Bleeds – Review

In the summer of 2003, gamers bore witness to a spectacular step backwards for the mainstream acceptance of video games. The one-two punch of the unfinished videogame Tomb Raider: Angel Of Darkness and the unwatchable movie Lara Croft: Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life. The awful Angel Of Darkness is a perfect example of a game rushed to release. After three years without a new title, the most visible franchise in gaming was in danger of being forgotten.

Minority Report – Review

Once upon a time, there was a little boy. This little boy loved only two things in the whole wide world. He loved videogames and he loved violent movies. The thing he loved most in the movies was when someone would get shot, or kicked, or thrown, and then they would smash through a window and fall a very, very long way down to their deaths. In the middle of endless Canadian nights, that little boy would stare up at the ceiling of his small room and wonder: Why can't I do that in a videogame?

Return to Castle Wolfenstein: Tides of War – Review

It seems that as long as there are videogames, there will be military-themed videogames. The most obvious explanation for the genre's continuing popularity is that gamers seem to love action, and the most obvious place to look for action is during a war. But which war? The Great War and the Korean War are fairly inaccessible, as evidenced by the fact that no one in the general public seems to know exactly why they happened, or who 'we' (by which, of course, I mean the American public for whom most of these games are made) were fighting.