Author: Daniel Weissenberger

Constantine – Review

The hardest games to review are the middle of the road titles. Talking about terrible games is just fun, and the biggest challenge when dealing with great games is finding twenty different words to replace 'great'. Then there are the titles that are just sort of there. Completely by-the-numbers productions that don't do anything particularly wrong, but don't stand out in any way either. If there's nothing to push against, nothing to think about, what is there to write about?

Moment of Silence – Review

Just a few minutes in, I was absolutely sure that Moment of Silence was a European game. It opens with a stunning cutscene that depicts a group of stormtroopers raiding a journalist's apartment and kidnapping him while his family looks on in horror. How does the main character react to this? Run out into the hallway, guns blazing? Climb out the window and work his way down a series of drainpipes and trellises to steal the SWAT team van so he can infiltrate their base? No, he watches the scene through a peep-hole and then, when the commotion has died down, he goes into the hallway and retrieves a teddy bear tossed aside during the struggle, then returns it to the crying child of the kidnapped reporter. So, yeah, right as the game begins, I'm fairly sure no North American developer was responsible for this.

Cold Fear – Review

Would coming out four months earlier have made a difference for Cold Fear? The game is so similar in almost every respect that it's difficult not to compare it to Resident Evil 4, and it suffers greatly by that comparison. So the question becomes, if there hadn't been a Resident Evil 4, would Cold Fear have recieved a higher mark than it's getting here? Probably not.

The Getaway: Black Monday – Review

Well, the gameplay still sucks. 2003's The Getaway was an attempt to raise videogames to the level of interactive film. One of the main ways they attempted to do this was by removing all obvious signs of "gameness"—no health bars, no ammo counters, no maps. Players were (in theory), left with a seamless playable movie.