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Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Review

Sparky Clarkson's picture

...and the Bland Played On

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Screenshot

HIGH The visit to the Fairyground.

LOW Losing the third phase of the final boss battle because of stun-locking.

WTF So I'm in a nursery inside a fairy's reproductive system?

The name "Ni No Kuni" means "The Second Country", which is about as dull a name as I can imagine for a tale where a boy's tears transform his favorite toy into a fairy who teaches him magic and then transports him to another world full of dragons, cat-pirates, violent banana bunches, and witches. Yet the game seemed to have promise, if only because of the involvement of beloved animation house Studio Ghibli. As it turns out, this amounted to putting lipstick on a pig. Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch wastes the artistic talents of its creators with tired design and sloppy execution.

Things start off promisingly enough. After a prologue in a charmingly-rendered small town, a fairy named Drippy conducts a young boy named Oliver to the second world in a quest to revive his mother. The first area has an engaging look built around the idea that its main inhabitants are anthropomorphic cats, but the game quickly descends into a tour of de rigeur landscapes and dungeon concepts.

The design doesn't even do the art of these places justice: Ni No Kuni obscures the finer details of the overworld with a drawn-back camera, and also by cloaking many parts of it in an eternal low-contrast night that dulls its beauty. As for the dungeons, the less said, the better. A few evince a degree of loving detail that makes wandering them worthwhile, but too often they degenerate into the same vast, empty hallways that dragged down other Level-5 role-playing games such as Rogue Galaxy.

Certain touches in the towns keep the Ghibli charm going—Yule's friendly yetis, Ding Dong Dell's fish-shaped spears, Hamelin's pig-masked grotesques and mechanical transformations. However, Ni No Kuni only realizes its potential when it reaches Drippy's home Fairyground. Here, the agreeable array of multi-hued, multi-shaped fairies, egg-shaped babies, and a bizarre biological nursery dungeon show off a level of invention equal to the quality of the game's art.

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Screenshot

Unfortunately, Ni No Kuni puts its few successful backdrops to poor use. The towns mostly serve as a stage for a blistering array of boring sidequests, many of which simply require Oliver to run back and forth two or three times to gather "pieces of heart" that he can use to cure "brokenhearted" individuals.

These quickly-handled incidents sometimes do a good job of fleshing out the supporting cast, but Ni No Kuni goes wrong when it handles the main characters in an equally discrete fashion. Oliver grows throughout the adventure, if only because his few moments of development are sprinkled sparingly among the plot episodes, but his allies Esther and Swaine experience completely atomistic arcs. Their main personal challenges are met, dealt with, and then the characters promptly sink into stasis. Aside from terribly clichéd sniping between Esther and Swaine, the main characters never play off of each other or grow together, so the game's attempts to emotionally trade on their friendship feel hollow and false.

This means Ni No Kuni must be sustained by its combat system, which never recovers from the developers' choice to base it on real-time action. The system's promising metaphor of manifesting "familiars" based on an individual's personality gets pushed aside almost as soon as it's introduced. By the second dungeon Oliver has borrowed someone else's familiar, and within a short time any monster can be recruited by the party and swapped between main characters.

This should be a strength of the system, but it actually adds frustration. Because familiars don't earn levels much faster than the main characters and are always recruited at a low level, they rapidly fall behind Oliver and must be brought up to par. The steep time investment this requires provides a powerful incentive to stick with the first few familiars found rather than exploring the diverse qualities of the whole set.

Even players who try to test out multiple familiars will find it difficult to explore their uses. Special commands must be selected in real time during combat, and virtually any command—even using items—can be interrupted by any enemy attack. Magic-oriented familiars will be even further hamstrung by the steep cost of regenerating magic power. As a result, most battles consist of repeatedly selecting a conventional attack.

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Screenshot

Here the game's lousy Artificial Intelligence (AI) begins to rear its head. Attacking (or defending) starts a timer window during which the player's familiar attempts to land a hit on the enemy. However, the familiar uses an AI-dictated path to its enemy. This can involve running in place while trying to pass through another monster (or ally), or, if the player has been careful enough to move his familiar close to its target on his own, jumping several paces backwards or to the side. With slow-moving familiars, it's entirely possible to order an attack while standing right next to an enemy and never have the familiar throw a punch at all.

The character AI is equally awful. Left to their own devices, Swaine and Esther will frequently call out familiars that are wildly inappropriate for the situation, or will even try to attack ineffectually on their own. The player can switch between characters easily, but because the dumb AI takes over immediately after switching away, the player's wise choices are not sustained. Even when they call out reasonable familiars, AI-controlled characters profligately waste magic power on massively powerful attacks against very weak enemies. The modest tactical menu Ni No Kuni offers is entirely unequal to the task of managing the AI's titanic idiocy.

Inevitably, these defects must be addressed by grinding. Ni No Kuni makes this more difficult than it needs to be, because for most of the mid- to late-game the vast majority of the world's mobs give 300 experience points, give or take 25. Like other games, Ni No Kuni has a few monsters that yield disproportionately high experience; unlike those games, defeating many of these creatures is absolutely essential to getting through the game without a spiritually crushing level of grind. Even with them, the game becomes so flabby that its emotional arc disintegrates long before Oliver reaches the end of his quest.

In a certain sense, Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch seems to be exactly as advertised. The quality of the artwork is unimpeachable, just as one might expect from the studio that created it. Unfortunately, the beauty of Ghibli has been painted onto the unimaginative and poorly-executed design of Level-5. As a result, Ni No Kuni turns out as blandly as its name suggests. Rating: 5.0 out of 10.

Disclosures: This game was obtained via retail purchase through Digital River. (On the basis of this experience, I strongly recommend that gamers avoid ever purchasing anything through a Digital River storefront.) The game was reviewed on the PS3. Approximately 50 hours of play was devoted to single-player mode, and the game was completed.

Parents: According to the ESRB, this game contains alcohol and tobacco reference, comic mischief, fantasy violence, mild language, and simulated gambling. There's absolutely no blood, and no direct fights between humans, and consequently the violence plays out below the level of a Tom and Jerry cartoon. As you might imagine, the story deals heavily with themes of parental death and letting go of departed loved ones. I would be hesitant to give this game to any child that has lost a parental figure recently. In addition to the fact that he's a boy wizard, some parents may be disturbed by the fact that Oliver's first familiar (among others) has a vaguely demonic appearance. The game is reading-heavy, and several puzzles rely on reading comprehension and solving ciphers.

Deaf & Hard of Hearing: Sound cues have an attentional benefit but are always accompanied by visual indicators. Subtitles are available for all dialogue.

Category Tags
Platform(s): PS3  
Developer(s): Studio Ghibli   Level-5  
Key Creator(s): Joe Hisaishi  
Publisher: Namco Bandai  
Series: Ni no Kuni  
Genre(s): Role-Playing  
ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+  
Articles: Game Reviews  

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Yes.

Well said, Mr. Clarkson.

I left this one unfinished, which feels so terrible...

Why, Level 5?...

This is a pretty harsh

This is a pretty harsh review considering what the game accomplishes. Even some of the worst games of the last 10 years can walk away with an 8, but 5 for a game that is actually very impressive and offers that nostalgic JRPG flavour which gaming has been lacking winds up with a 5. I don't get it. Even if it's not your cup of tea the game objectively shouldn't sit below a 7. Also, Level 5 has not done as well in recent years but they are a top-knotch company (case in point dark cloud 2 and rogue galaxy... 2 fantastic games) that has injected much creativity and innovation into the RPG genre. The fact that you pass them off as bland and a great game off as basically an F (like what the dumbest kid in class gets who can't even process capitals and periods or something) disappoints me. I don't know who you are, but maybe you shouldn't be reviewing games.

Unfortunately accurate review

This review is the most accurate one out there - unfortunately. I read it before I bought Ni No Kuni just recently (thankfully for a much reduced price), and wrote it off as Gamecritic's arrogance and pomposity.

For the first few hours 'playing' this game I had a big grin on my face. I'm a fanatical Ghibli Fan (waiting patiently for Spirited Away on Bluray) and this seemed so perfect. The art style is stunning, the 2D animation is breath-taking - it IS Ghibli. But, it quickly gives way to 3D cell shaded animation, which then dominates - that's okay - it is still impeccably designed... but then...

Mr Clarkson is being generous I believe. This game is broken. I don't mind grinding; if the mechanics are fun I even prefer a grind - a game that gives an option to overpower your characters can still be fun. But the basic 'battle' gameplay mechanics in this game are terrible. 'Real time combat' is actually turn based combat with fiddly menu's, only 'real time' in the sense that you are getting attacked and interupted constantly. The fact that the game is phenominally easily means you don't bother with complex strategies anyway, you just use the same attack over and over again. With repetitive strategies used in repetitive battles - even with a Ghibli backdrop - it is simply not worth it.

I won't ever make it to the Fairy Kingdom sadly. I'm sure it was as beautiful as the other central locations; but my patience has been ground down by the hideous 'gameplay'. I watched the ending on youtube and was consoled by the fact that 2D Ghibli animation makes no appearance at the end. I am happy to stop when the best is behind me.

I'm sorry gamecritics - I will listen next time!

Welcome to the Matrix, bro

Welcome to the Matrix, bro

Best Comment Evar!

Caleb wrote:

This review is the most accurate one out there - unfortunately. I read it before I bought Ni No Kuni just recently (thankfully for a much reduced price), and wrote it off as Gamecritic's arrogance and pomposity.

For the first few hours 'playing' this game I had a big grin on my face. I'm a fanatical Ghibli Fan (waiting patiently for Spirited Away on Bluray) and this seemed so perfect. The art style is stunning, the 2D animation is breath-taking - it IS Ghibli. But, it quickly gives way to 3D cell shaded animation, which then dominates - that's okay - it is still impeccably designed... but then...

Mr Clarkson is being generous I believe. This game is broken. I don't mind grinding; if the mechanics are fun I even prefer a grind - a game that gives an option to overpower your characters can still be fun. But the basic 'battle' gameplay mechanics in this game are terrible. 'Real time combat' is actually turn based combat with fiddly menu's, only 'real time' in the sense that you are getting attacked and interupted constantly. The fact that the game is phenominally easily means you don't bother with complex strategies anyway, you just use the same attack over and over again. With repetitive strategies used in repetitive battles - even with a Ghibli backdrop - it is simply not worth it.

I won't ever make it to the Fairy Kingdom sadly. I'm sure it was as beautiful as the other central locations; but my patience has been ground down by the hideous 'gameplay'. I watched the ending on youtube and was consoled by the fact that 2D Ghibli animation makes no appearance at the end. I am happy to stop when the best is behind me.

I'm sorry gamecritics - I will listen next time!

Best Comment Evar! ;-)

"Even if it's not your cup

"Even if it's not your cup of tea the game objectively shouldn't sit below a 7."

To Geeb: Although I do not agree with the actual score that the reviewer (and apparently at least some of this site's official members) gave this game, you must understand that all game reviews are subjective. Gamecritics is certainly no exception.

To Sparky Clarkson: That said, I am still curious about the score even when considering your own scale, Clarkson. The review seems a little "nitpicky" to me (e.g. the metaphor of the familiars to the "personalities" of the characters, the overworld camera, the grinding, re-leveling the metamorphed familiars, etc). Although you have also pointed out the main flaws of game (notably the AI) that I admit to, I do not see how it absolutely brings the game down on its knees. If you want a really good argument against the battle system, you should point out that you have no direct control over your characters/familiars in battle (and that could very well be a big deal for these types of games).

As for the story, I suppose you (and most everyone else) expected dynamic character development. Remember, what is most important/relevant in this game: the theme.

This is just my two cents. I am not all in disagreement with you (Ni No Kuni is not a perfect game), yet I am still questioning your actual review.

"Mr Clarkson is being

"Mr Clarkson is being generous I believe. This game is broken. I don't mind grinding; if the mechanics are fun I even prefer a grind - a game that gives an option to overpower your characters can still be fun. But the basic 'battle' gameplay mechanics in this game are terrible. 'Real time combat' is actually turn based combat with fiddly menu's, only 'real time' in the sense that you are getting attacked and interupted constantly."

There is nothing "wrong" with the actual battle mechanics (they are not perfect, but certainly not game breaking), the "basics" are very dry cut and simple. The problem for you (and the reviewers of this site) is perhaps the battle system itself (the hybrid turn-based and action aspect). The menu layouts of the battle system really is not that bad at all. Then again, I DID play FFXII (and that my friend has the legitimate argument of broken, terrible battle mechanics), and this game is a significant improvement to that.

At this point, let's just get real here: Just say you do not like the actual battle system/style. End of story. It is okay to simply say you do not like something, there is no need to justify yourself with a few reviewers who agree with you.

excellent review

Kudos for a great review that just saved me from a possible purchase mistake. I too am a huge Ghibli fan, but pretty pictures do not a great game make.

This review isn't just accurate, but the descriptions are concise and well-structured so I didn't have to puzzle over how the criticism matched gameplay. Big props.

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