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Video: Duke Nukem Forever gameplay footage

Duke Nukem Forever may never see release, but I know that, like me, you've been dying to get a look at the actual game. Whether it was ready for release or not, you want to see something. And here it is.

Now, graphically, it looks like it stands up. I love seeing Duke's legs, arms and hands when he climbs, runs or falls. Lots of shiny sweat on said arms and legs. It looks like they were incorporating all of the visual bells and whistles. And (most of) the enemies look nice, but it's the AI that doesn't seem at all smart. What definitely don't stand up are the one-liners. I don't know if they were added for this demo or what, but they sound canned. Imagine that, the bread and butter of the Duke Nukem franchise just sound out of place and antiquated.

Again, this is a demo and isn't necessarily indicative of the entire game—but having nothing else to compare it to—we have to look at this brief look and come away a little disappointed. Ah, well.

Navigating streets of NYC easier when they resemble "Halo"

Jack Schulze and Matt Webb's Here and There mapWho could have imagined that the next evolution or revolution in maps would have been influenced by videogames?

We could, actually.

Of course, ours involved three-dimensional, cybernetic, holographic overlays ala Dead Space or Grand Theft Auto.

Jack Schulze and Matt Webb, creators of the "Here and There" map, were indeed influenced by games—even some not so obvious ones—but games were just one of many influences. (This is probably a good thing given how limited most in-game maps actually are.)

So far it is simply available in poster form, but a 3D-perspective melded with a top down view would seem to have profound applications outside of gaming. Not that gaming wouldn't see a benefit. Gaming worlds are getting bigger and navigating them can be as daunting as navigating the streets of Manhattan for some of us. A "Here and There"-influenced map would be a godsend.

Protesters arrested at Army's videogame recruitment center

The Army Experience Center is the latest effort by the Army to use games to recruit teens and young adults. This has drawn the ire of parents and anti-war activists.

Crysis and Unreal engines recreate classic movie scenes

Winners of Game-Artist "Scene from a Movie" Competition

This goes up on the cool wall.

Game-Artist got some computer artists together for a competition to see who could come up with the most authentic, real-time environment from a movie. The winning entries were from Bladerunner (seen above), Steven Spielberg's Hook, Aliens, X-Men 2 and I am Legend.

I won't spoil who won—you can probably figure it out though—because you really have to see more of these recreations for yourself.

GameCritics.com Podcast Bonus Episode: What is the Citizen Kane of Video Games?

While Tim takes some time off to enjoy his new son, we present our very first bonus episode! In these deleted scenes from Episode 14, you'll hear a great segment on how casual games relate to Heather Chaplin’s GDC rant, and then we try to answer that classic gaming question “What is the Citizen Kane of Video Games?” Our answers will shock and amaze you. Featuring Chi Kong Lui, Mike Bracken, David Stone, and the very sleepy Tim Spaeth.

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The Horror Geek presents: Ghostbusters opening cinematic now online

I'm pretty interested in this Ghostbusters videogame that's due out in June. I think that's because it's like a national law that anyone my age (37 later this year…) love Ghostbusters in general. If you were around the age of 12 when the first film hit, it was probably one of your favorite films. And since it's that rare childhood favorite that still holds up when viewed as an adult, a whole generation still seems to love anything Ghostbusters related.

GameTrailers posted the opening cinematic video from the upcoming game—and I'm impressed. They really nailed the feel of the first movie and I was surprised how much nostalgia this thing inspired in me in the span of a few short minutes. My only complaint is the expository dialogue from the one guard (nice information dump there, guys…), but everything else looks great.

Check it out for yourself and see what you think. The game makes its retail debut on the PS3, Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, PC, PS2, and Nintendo DS on June 16th.

ShellShock 2: Blood Trails Review

Tragedy: Exploited!

Shellshock 2: Blood Trails Screenshot

HIGH Finally a zombie game since Resident Evil 2 that acknowledges shooting them in the leg is a really good tactic.

LOW It's a Vietnam war game with absolutely nothing to say about the conflict other than: it happened.

WTF Okay, so you're turned into a zombie—I get putting on a gas mask and picking up two cleavers. Hey, who wouldn't? But how does that make you bulletproof?

The Horror Geek presents: BioShock Movie drowning in sea of financial difficulties

bioshock

I'm really looking forward to the BioShock movie for a number of different reasons. First off, I love the game to death–it's creepy, it's got an engaging story, and it was a blast to play. Second, I'd really like to see a movie based on a videogame that turns out to be good. I think this is the property that could give game movies the same sort of legitimacy that comic films now enjoy. Finally, I got the impression that maybe Universal understood the potential of what they had and were going to pull out all the stops to make a great movie. They hired an interesting director, Gore Verbinski, and they appeared ready to spare no expense in bringing his vision to the screen.

Interview with Terry Cavanagh, creator of Don't Look Back

Interview with Terry Cavanagh, creator of Don't Look Back

A few weeks ago, a Twitter acquaintance hipped me to a small indie game called Don't Look Back. Although I am a big fan of small titles, I’m also console to the core… this has historically been a bit of conflict, although less so now that we've got so many download services available. However, Don't Look Back came highly recommended, so I put up with using the arrow keys and space bar for a little while, and walked away quite impressed. Thankfully, the game's creator was willing to speak with me for a bit about himself and his work.

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