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Seaman Review

Seaman Screenshot

Seaman isn't a game in the traditional "command and conquer" sense. Seaman is a somewhat passive experience best described as part digital pet and part conversational simulator, but 100 percent strangeness.

Space Channel 5 – Review

And so it pleases me greatly to see that in Sega's latest music/rhythm genre release, Space Channel 5, 'sexiness' isn't something the game merely wears on its sleeve, but rather something that is ingrained into the very fabric of the gameplay. Most of Space Channel 5's sex appeal is attributed to one thing—or, rather, character—its knockout bombshell of a protagonist, appropriately named Ulala (pronounced Ooh-la-la).

Space Channel 5 – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Mild Animated Violence, Suggestive Themes 

Space Channel 5

Game Description: Meet Ulala (pronounced ooh-la-la), a rookie reporter assigned to cover a breaking dance news story. Pudgy dancing aliens (resembling futuristic gummy bears) have beamed down and are zapping human inhabitants into an offbeat dance step. More than just watch from the sidelines, Ulala must free fellow earthlings from the spell by matching the aliens' dance moves step for step. Unlike when playing previous move-memorization games such as Simon and Concentration, players of Space Channel 5 will need to feel the rhythm—the tempo, pauses, and idiosyncrasies of the beat—as well as the sequence of steps to get it right.

Space Channel 5 – Second Opinion

I agree with Chi on the issue of Ulalas sex appeal and the unusual style of the game. From first glance, Space Channel 5 is unlike anything Ive seen before and the overall design gives it the feel of an interactive American Bandstand or Soul Train -- or MTVs The Grind for our younger readers. Granted some of her dancing and gyrations can best be described as "suggestive," it is all in keeping with the direction the designers are heading. The character and level designs are perfect for this type of game and the mannerisms and animations of the supporting characters are hilarious. Combined with the catchy music, all of these elements come together to add personality and flare to a game already ripe with individuality.

Maken X – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Animated Violence

Maken X – Review

In critiquing Maken X, I am surprised I went this long without blasting the game's overall look. Although the game is rendered with crisp, high-resolution graphics, it is ruined by the choice of character designs and models. Being the anime fan I am, I have no problem with Asmik Ace keeping the anime-look and porting it into a three-dimensional environment. After all Capcom and Square have done it wonderfully with Power Stone and Final Fantasy VIII respectively, and the games were the better for it. The one caveat is that the designs must be appealing to begin with.

Maken X

Game Description: With exciting first-person sword combat and an engaging storyline with multiple endings, Maken X is one of the most unusual action- adventure games to hit the Dreamcast. Players assume the role of Maken, a supernatural entity that can "brain-jack" the minds and bodies of other characters to utilize their particular strengths and knowledge. Not a bad skill, especially given the evil and gruesome baddies that Maken must overcome. Using a unique lock-on system that targets an opponent's weakest area, Maken takes advantage of a variety of hand-held weapons. As the story unfolds through 20 massive levels, your specific actions will decide your gaming route (as well as which ending you'll uncover).

Maken X – Second Opinion

I have incredible soft spot for games that take preexisting genres and really put their own spin on it. This was truly the case with Maken X. While it uses the first-person view to full effect; it plays nothing like the usual Quake-engine based shooter. Instead, Maken X fuse styles of gameplay (hand-to-hand combat, lock-on feature, charged attacks, blocks, computer AI patterns) more commonly found in console games with the first-person view.

Thousand Arms – Review

Thousand Arms is a game that is so distinctively Japanese through every part of its fiber, that only a user base familiar and understanding of the cultural, Japanese nuances present in it will be able to comprehend and enjoy the game. Its localized release clearly signals that such a phenomenon has taken place in the United States.

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