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Metroid: Zero Mission Review

Metroid: Zero Mission Screenshot Metroid: Zero Mission Screenshot

Borrowing the slick control mechanics and stylish aesthetics of 2002's excellent Metroid Fusion, Zero Mission stands as a timely and more than competent re-telling of the series' origins for those of us eagerly awaiting the next installments.

Metroid: Zero Mission

Game Description: A Game Boy Advance update/remake of the original adventure shooter, that adds a whole new mission continuing the story after the defeat of Mother Brain. She's battled baddies on nearly every Nintendo system, cleaned house in the Super Smash Bros. series and recently blasted off for heroic adventures on the GameCube and the Game Boy Advance. Samus Aran returns to her roots and relives the story that started it all revealing for the first time full details of her meeting with the Metroids.

R-Type Final – Review

Solid gameplay will always trump fancy graphics, but that doesn't mean that 2D titles can get by without any sort of graphical enhancements. But what can be done with a traditional side-scroller like R-Type Final to make it appealing to a new generation of gamers who've probably never even played the original in an arcade? How about, for starters, giving it some sparkling graphics and a quasi-3D engine (similar to the one found in last year's Contra: Shattered Soldier) while retaining all the twitchy trigger-finger gameplay of the originals?

R-Type Final – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Fantasy Violence

Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel – Review

Why publisher Interplay and developer Black Isle Studio chose to ignore this rich historical lineage and make a game that has more in common with Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance than the original PC incarnations is beyond me. Chalk it up as yet another example of console gamers getting the short end of the proverbial stick.

Hunter: The Reckoning—Redeemer – Review

The third Hunter title (and the second released in 2003) is essentially more of the supernaturally-tinged hack-and-slash action fans have come to expect from the series. Developer High Voltage Studios has apparently taken an "if it ain't tragically broke, don't fix it" approach to this title, and so the final results are at least somewhat mixed.

Hunter: The Reckoning—Redeemer – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Blood and Gore, Violence

Hunter: The Reckoning—Wayward – Review

Wayward is a direct sequel to the first game in the series, which is interesting since PS2 owners never had access to the title. Undaunted, developer High Voltage picks up the story two years after the events in the first game. The evil that our four original hunters appeared to have vanquished in the town of Ashcroft seems to have come back for more.

Hunter: The Reckoning—Wayward – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Blood and Gore, Violence

Mega Man: Network Transmission – Second Opinion

No longer a platform-hopping lil' guy in blue, Mega Man is now a muscular online avatar of sorts, an extension of his offline counterpart Lan. I'm reminded of the anthropomorphic logos that were common in the 1950's but were retired in modern times, because a walking stack of tires (Michelin) just wasn't "cool." Perhaps this MegaMan.EXE avatar was brought to the console by Capcom in order to prove that their gaming icon can stay relevant.

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