About Us | Game Reviews | Feature Articles | Podcast | Best Work | Forums | Shop | Review Game

Mature (17+)

Silent Scope – Review

Silent Scope is a port. Nothing more, nothing less. What's more its not a very good one. Based on the arcade game of the same name, it throws you into the role of a sniper for hire. The President and his family have been kidnapped by a generic band of terrorists and it is up to rescue them. Ordinarily, Id jump at the opportunity to play the role of a sniper—many is the time I died in GoldenEye 007 and Perfect Dark while trying to score nothing but headshots on my targets—but Konamis release is so flawed that I couldn't even enjoy such a base indulgence.

Silent Scope

Game Description: With the amount of ammunition players are expected to use in the average shooting game, one could just as well crush enemies under the weight of their spent shells. But not so for Silent Scope, where the plan is to drop the target with one squeeze of the trigger—even at hundreds of yards away. In this game, you're a highly trained sniper with the most advanced long-range weapon available, outfitted with night-vision scope and a laser sight. You'll line your target up while it's just a dot to the naked eye, then put the crosshairs on it in your long-range scope and make the kill.

Silent Scope – Second Opinion

What really kills me is that this game could have really opened up some new possibilities in narrative and action. Can you imagine if Silent Scope was based on a similar plot device like the Hitchcock classic "Rear Window?"

Metal Gear Solid 2 First Impressions

If first impressions are critical, Konami got Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (MGS2) off to a dazzling start in May of 2000. At the world’s largest videogame tradeshow, E3, the media and gamers alike were treated to a sneak-peek of the title in the form of a dramatic Hollywood-style movie trailer shown through-out the three-day event.

Onimusha: Warlords – Review

I usually like to spend the first portion of a review talking about interesting concepts or ideas present in the game I am about to review. Sometimes it takes a more personal slant, other times it might be historical or relate to current trends in the game world and society at large. After playing Onimusha, I was at a loss.

Onimusha: Warlords – Consumer Guide

According to the ESRB, this game contains: Blood and Gore, Violence

Onimusha: Warlords

Game Description: Set during the medieval period, Onimusha: Warlords is a survival horror game that puts you in the difficult position of having to save a kidnapped princess from the evil General Nobanaga. Enter Nobanaga's castle and use a variety of blade weapons as well as the Demon's Head, which acts as both a shield and a weapon, against his foul minions. More than just fighting, Onimusha: Warlords presents a number of puzzles that must be solved if you're to get to the princess. The game also boasts both real-time polygonal backgrounds and characters.

Onimusha: Warlords – Second Opinion

While I don't entirely agree with Brad's review of Onimusha, Im not exactly going to dispute much of it either. His points are for the most part valid. I just wasnt as annoyed or bored by Onimusha as he was (or at least not as quickly as he was).

Conker's Bad Fur Day

Game Description: Conker's Bad Fur Day is for adults, the ESRB has rated this game Mature; it should not be bought for—or played by or around—children. That stated, the story of the game is the following: Conker's very good night turns into a very bad day. He has to deal with a crazy and abusive world, all while suffering through a massive hangover. Conker encounters abusive paint pots; jabbering dung beetles; trigger-happy, scar-faced Tediz; and a belligerent giant, with only a frying pan as a means of self-defense. He is resourceful, however, and makes the best of his situation. The game combines elements of 3D exploration, combat, and puzzle solving.

Conker's Bad Fur Day – Review

There are a few significant design choices in both structure and content which make Bad Fur Day stand out from its brethren, however, as I as I just mentioned, platform games are a dime a dozen. The real selling point behind Bad Fur Day aren't the twists on gameplay, but rather the radical approach Rare's taken with regard to content and humor . While Nintendo has traditionally been known for being a bastion of decency and family values (remember the "tame" version of Mortal Kombat on the Super NES?), it appears that they have reached a stage where they are ready to take risks.

Code of Conduct

Comments are subject to approval/deletion based on the following criteria:
1) Treat all users with respect.
2) Post with an open-mind.
3) Do not insult and/or harass users.
4) Do not incite flame wars.
5) Do not troll and/or feed the trolls.
6) No excessive whining and/or complaining.

Please report any offensive posts here.

For more video game discussion with the our online community, become a member of our forum.

Our Game Review Philosophy and Ratings Explanations.

About Us | Privacy Policy | Review Game | Contact Us | Twitter | Facebook |  RSS
Copyright 1999–2010 GameCritics.com. All rights reserved.