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Mature (17+)

Typing of the Dead

Game Description: Typing of the Dead blends horror with a typing tutorial for an original gaming experience. There are several game modes to help you become a terrific typist. Drill mode focuses on different skills, such as typing speed, accuracy, reflex, and special keystrokes. In the boss mode, your battle against each boss emphasizes a different skill, from quick reading and answering to story reading and typing. Two-player modes include cooperative and competitive.

Typing of the Dead – Consumer Guide

According to the ESRB, this game contains: Animated Blood & Gore, Animated Violence

Typing of the Dead – Review

If there was ever any doubt that Sega was the leader in video-game innovation, the string of games bursting with fresh ideas released during the current Dreamcast generation will surely lay any such fears to rest. Has there ever been such a wide variety of techniques, approaches or just plain whacked-out, kooky ideas from one publisher? I really don't think so.

Quake III Arena (Dreamcast) – Second Opinion

I'm pretty much in agreement with Mike on this one. Quake III Arena is fast, violent and addictive—so much so that I found myself glued to the game without a care in the world for what I was doing, where I was or how I got there. I became so addicted to the game that my brain would liquefy and go on auto pilot for hours at a time—totally desensitized to all of the lightening-quick violence and utterly oblivious to the online opponents I was mercilessly fragging.

Quake III: Arena (Dreamcast) – Review

The Dreamcast port of Quake III has for the most part stayed true to its PC cousin.

Quake III: Arena (Dreamcast) – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Animated Blood and Gore, Animated Violence

Dino Crisis 2 – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Animated Blood & Gore, Animated Violence

Dino Crisis 2

Game Description: Dino Crisis 2 picks up where the original left off. While continuing Dr. Kirk’s research into Third Energy, the government has opened a rift in time. Now, an elite team of operatives must travel back in time and rescue any survivors and recover the Third Energy device. You take control of Regina and Dylan as they use their special talents and maybe a weapon or two to get through the mission. Along the way, they will encounter 10 species of dinosaurs that are looking for a human snack. It’s up to you to save the Third Energy device and return home safely in Dino Crisis 2.

Dino Crisis 2 – Second Opinion

My feeling on Dino Crisis 2 is that it's too little, too late. I have a good respect for the original because it tried to do a few things differently then most survival-horror titles, and while it wasn't anything earth-shattering, I still appreciated the effort.

Dino Crisis 2 – Review

For such a young genre, it has quickly gained a feeling of "been there, done that" in the few years since its explosion onto the scene. In fact, looking back at the list of games that qualify as survival horror, I'd pick only three as being the best representatives of what this type of game has to offer: Resident Evil for starting off the craze, Silent Hill for making things truly chilling and Dino Crisis 2 for putting an entirely different spin on how the game can be played.

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