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GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 25 Transcript

Transcript of GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 25: Myths of Game Criticism – Part 2

GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 24 Transcript

Transcript of GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 24: Myths of Game Criticism

GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 23 Transcript

Transcript of GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 23: Aram Jabbari of Atlus on the Business of Localization, Ratings PR and Demon's Souls

GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 22 Transcript

Transcript of GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 22: Scribblenauts, Muramasa, and Are games too hard?

GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 21 Transcript

Transcript of GameCritics.com Podcast Episode 21: Jenova Chen of thatgamecompany

Who needs video?: "Non-visual" mobile phone games for blind and sighted players

Who needs video? Non-visual mobile phone games for blind and sighted players

Computer scientists at the Pontíficia Universidade Católica in Rio de Janeiro are working on non-visual games for mobile phones that they hope will be fun for players who are blind, have low vision or are sighted. In a paper in the Journal of the Brazilian Computer Society, Luis Valente, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza and Bruno Feijó describe their protype adventure game Audio Flashlight. They also discuss some things they learned during field testing about making games accessible to players with visual impairments.

Study: Certain video games may help improve decision-making skills of people with intellectual disabilities

Study: Certain video games may help improve decision-making skills of people with intellectual disabilities

Researchers from Trent University and the Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing at Nottingham University have found that some kinds of video games may help people with intellectual disabilities improve their ability to make decisions.

Motion control: Boon or bane for gamers with disabilities?

With all the studies on therapeutic uses for Nintendo's Wiimote, a deaf school's innovative use of PlayStation Portables and the potential for Microsoft's Project Natal to make games accessible to players with disabilities thanks to its ability to recognize objects, voices, gestures and facial expressions, it's easy to think that motion-sensing technology is an unequivocal boon to players with disabilities everywhere. But is it? It's certainly easier for some people with disabilities to move an arm than to push a small button (or six). But what about those players with disabilities who are attracted to video games partly because pushing buttons allows them to do things they cannot otherwise do? Will the move toward motion control realism bar some players from their hobby?

Disabilities, Nintendo's Demo Play and a wishlist

New Super Mario Bros. Wii Screenshot

While I think Nintendo's Demo Play feature would be great for skipping the boring or poorly-designed bits of a mostly-good game, some people wonder if games getting their own players "unstuck" is the end of gaming as we know it. Others point out that this feature may be very useful for players with disabilities, who may find parts of a game completely impossible.

Wiimote hacked to help people with disabilities

Nintendo Wii Nunchuck

At this month's DEFCON hackers' conference, engineering students Josh Marks, Rob Rehrig and Larry Aiello did a demonstration of their project WiiAssist, (PDF here) which allows people with disabilities to use the Nintendo Wiimote as a head-pointer and the Wii Balance Board as a mouse. VultureBeat's Dean Takashi writes:

"[T]he project adapts the infrared sensors in the Wii controller, which detects a Wii game player’s motion and position, so that it can be attached to someone’s head. The sensor is then used to track head movements, which can control a mouse in a computer application."

The University of Delaware students chose the Wiimote in part because it can track up to four infrared sources and it has Bluetooth capabilities, as well as an open-source library for Windows and Linux machines called Wiiuse, which supports "motion sensiong, IR tracking, nunchuck, classic controller, and the Guitar Hero 3 controller."

Long-term goals for WiiAssist include sign language recognition and a design that uses less power and fewer wires.

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